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Summer 2017

We’re now involved in green roofing projects from Pembrokeshire to St Kilda (and nowhere inbetween…..). The bees are working the English stonecrop on our own nearly finished barn roof, and a new build near Fishguard has a covering of our growing medium planted with both English and biting stonecrop, alongside thrift, sheep’s bit, kidney vetch and a host of other Pembrokeshire coastal plants that should cope with the exposed conditions that they’ll be subject to. Matt’s been up to St Kilda to assess options for the green roof to cover a new building there. The former inhabitants traditionally turfed all of their houses and storehouse (‘cleits’), as well as using dried sods as fuel. They didn’t have modern equipment like the turf-cutting bucket that we used on a recent translocation project, but they also didn’t have archaeological and ecological constraints to be mindful of. This new roof is set to be an interesting challenge!

Spring 2017

We got schmoozed by the BBC last year, and the resultant feature with Kate Humble has already generated interest in our seed from as far afield as Germany. Our wilfully non-commercial attitude seemed to come across OK, but among the many bits that got left on the cutting room floor was my plug for Flora Locale. I suggested that potential customers outside of Wales should look for a supplier of direct-harvested meadow seed in their own region. We’re conservation-minded before business-minded, and keen to see wild meadows retain their own local distinctiveness wherever possible. Plantlife have put together a good explanation for this approach at http://www.plantlife.org.uk/uk/our-work/campaigning-change/keeping-wild-wildflower. With this in mind, if you’re after seed for a garden then we’ll happily sell our 250g seed bags when we have them back in stock in late summer. If you’re a rural landowner with a larger meadow, then it would be better for you to visit www.floralocale.org and choose a local supplier of direct-harvested seed from their recommended supplier page (we’re not actually on there – we’re too tight to pay the fee!).

We’ve got Charlie and Meyrick from MC-Rustics helping us to build another seed-drying and beekeeping storage barn – turf roofed (of course) and with space for beehives built into the south-facing straw-bale wall (to be plastered with dung from our cows and clay from a new pond). Can’t wait to see it finished.

Autumn 2016

After a somewhat fickle season, our harvests are more or less in now. We have meadow wild-flower seed for sale from several west-Wales sites. Don’t delay if you’re interested – now is the ideal time to be sowing. We’ll soon have bluebell and wild garlic bulbs available for planting in those shady corners where meadow seed wouldn’t be so successful. There’s some good honey coming off the hives as well. We noted bees foraging on at least 60 different plants this year, which helps to account for the depth of flavour.

Summer 2016

We’re harvesting wildflower meadow seed once again, and we’ll soon have Welsh meadow seed mixtures for sale. We’re adding some new collection sites this year – check out the wildflower meadow seed page for details. We’re also working for Plantlife, taking forward their Coronation Meadows restoration projects in Ceredigion and Glamorgan. In the meantime, the honey is starting to come off the hives, and there’s some fine spring hawthorn honey available if you’re quick.

The Mystery of the Swarm

Old-school beekeeping books often like to draw parallels between bee and human societies. Well, with our bees throwing out numerous swarms around the time of the referendum result, I thought a couple of passages from that reliable observer of bee politics, Tickner Edwardes, in order.

“The old green hive is keeping up to its reputation. Already it is the centre of a whirling crowd of bees, and, as you look, a dense black stream of them is pouring out of the entrance so fast and furiously that it is impossible to distinguish what they are. And the old wild trek-song is growing louder and deeper with every moment, a rich vibrant tenor note unlike any other sound in nature. There is no doubt at all of its import, as you stand in the wing-darkened sunshine, caught up in the excitement of it all, and feeling much as if you were facing a tearing sou’-west gale……

…..Gently swaying in the sunlight, lifeless and inert but for a few restless bees that hum about it, the sight of a settled swarm has an almost uncanny effect on most observers. A little before, the whole garden was filled with its deafening, joyous hubbub; now a strange silence has fallen, and it is impossible to dissociate from its present state the idea of an abject depression and disillusionment, as though the whole thing had been but a mad escapade. If we may conceive the issue of a swarm to be a freak of ancestral memory, the sudden irresistible impulse to follow an old racial habit, long obsolete, it is not difficult to account for the obvious change of mind that has now come over the absconding host. Packed within the hive in a feverish, surging multitude, disabilities were not self-evident as they are now, tried in the light of day.

Violent delights have violent ends / And in their triumph, die”

Boris and co, take note……

Winter 2015

With storm after storm sweeping across, it’s been a good winter for inside jobs. Long-promised domestic improvements are finally made, and ecological survey contracts for NRW and Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority are written up. With few fungi in our woods this season, Matt becomes a moss geek instead, and establishes the farm as the richest place in the county for these subtle plants. We’re about to double the size of our beekeeping enterprise, with new hives and out-apiaries planned. If we get good August weather, we’ll be taking hives to the heather so should have some fine heathland honey this time next year. Still a few jars of our fine harvest from the summer available, as well as a small amount of meadow seed and a couple of boxes of beef.

Summer 2015

Well, we managed a few days of play but high summer is now upon us and we’re gearing up for all the harvesting jobs. We just need the weather to hold now…..

We’ve been installing a new green roof for the RNLI / BAM Nuttall at St Justinians, using native coastal plants from Pembrokeshire.

Welsh Black beef now available again, see under our ‘products’ tab for full details. Honey harvest coming very soon – we’re just waiting for the knapweed flow to come to an end, as that’s a key part of the special flavour.

Spring 2015

The dry, sunny April was a great help. The bees enjoyed a good flow on blossoms like blackthorn which would perhaps normally succumb to wind and rain within a few days. The early surplus which they’ve put away (one hive has filled four supers) will be left on to see them through the cool, wet summer days which will no doubt follow.

We’re taking seed orders now, and it looks like being a busy summer picking yellow rattle and wetland seed. We’ve got some work lined up with Plantlife on their Coronation Meadows Project too. Matt attended a meeting of meadow restoration practitioners recently, which will hopefully result in some ‘best practice’ guidance being published by Plantlife in due course.

Winter 2014

Ecological consultancy work for National Trust, Natural Resources Wales and The Freshwater Habitats Trust is keeping us busy. The maintenance jobs on the farm, such as replacing rotten softwood posts with cleft oak stakes from Heinz Cooper in Carmarthenshire, are having to fit in around these contracts and the rest of the workload. Matt’s still found some time to disappear into the woods in search of fungi, and some of the more interesting finds are described on the Fungi page. There will be some beef available in the second week of January – if anyone’s interested there are still currently a couple of boxes going spare.

Summer 2014

With August now upon us, we’re busy collecting and selling wildflower seed from our meadows. We’ve harvested a good amount from Blaencleddau in north Pembrokeshire too, and are about to collect from the orchid rich meadows at the National Botanic Gardens NNR and Mountain Meadows SSSI. We’ve also just harvested seed from HRH Prince Charles’ Carmarthenshire estate, for use on his own meadow creation projects. Don’t delay if you’re starting a wildflower meadow – the seed needs to get into the ground as soon as possible now, to mimic the natural cycles of the hay meadow. We’re yet to cut hay – it’s been tempting with the hot, dry weather but we’ve held on for the seed, and for the profusion of knapweed and betony which is keeping the honey flowing into the hives. There will be a good surplus for sale this year.

The ecological consultancy has completed numerous Phase I surveys, and some land management advisory jobs. That hasn’t left as much time for the continued investigations into the wildlife on the farm, but the plant list has just hit 360 with the addition of several locally rare plants. Hopefully the workload will ease in a month or two, and we can spend a bit more time in the woods……

Spring 2014

This year looks like it could be another good one for our bees. With five strong new hives and three early swarms working hard at the hawthorn blossom, we’re looking forward to some fine honey again by the end of summer.

The meadows are exploding to life with marsh orchids and as much yellow rattle as ever. We’ll be harvesting these for wildflower meadow seed to sell again, and we’ll also be taking our brush harvester to various other species-rich meadows in south and west Wales. If you’re creating a wildflower meadow in Wales and you’d like seed of native meadow plants, do please get in touch. Now’s the time to start plans and preparations, and we’re always happy to give advice.

Our own somewhat idiosyncratic living and office space is currently getting a new green roof. We’re sorting through a pile of building stone and rubble left from the previous homestead, and the lime-rich soil, mortar and the occasional tuft of ivy-leaved toadflax is being spread out over the slab-wood / liner / carpet sandwich. It’ll be interesting to see what other plants get a toe-hold here in time.

Autumn 2013

We had a busy summer harvesting meadow seed from our Pembrokeshire sites, and also undertaking contract harvesting jobs on a metal mine in north Ceredigion and Prince Charles’s farm near Myddfai.

We have a few kilos of meadow seed still available but time’s now running out to get this in the ground. Contact us as soon as possible if you’d like some.

The honey crop was superb this year and there are jars for sale.